City of Immigrants: Winner of the 2015 International Serious Play Awards

The City of Immigrants supports the study of immigration, the labor movement, and cultural identity in the American History curriculum. The game put players in the role of Lena Brodsky, a 14-year-old Russian Jewish teen who has recently immigrated to New York City in 1907. As Lena makes the Lower East Side her home, she struggles to support her family and becomes part of the growing labor movement.

City-of-Immigrants-Screen-Shot

The game is the fourth interactive experience in the award-winning Mission U series of free, digital role-playing games created to engage middle and high school students in the exploration and understanding of U.S. history.

(source)

Sim Democracy – Thailand

Questions about democracy in Thailand have been hitting the headlines recently.Learning World explores how one project aims to help students understand governance.

The game is called “Sim Democracy

In the game, the board represents a country and is divided into four sectors – hospitals, schools, forests and police stations, which represent public health, education, environment and security. To start the game, each of four teams runs a brief election campaign to decide who will govern.

“Sim Democracy” continuously receives interest from educators in the region. It is now adapted for universities in Malaysia and South Asia.

Award Winner – Games for Change 2014

OUTCASTED –  a social impact game that puts players in the shoes of a homeless person – is the winner of the Games for Change Students Challenge, an initiative by Games for Change Europe, Autodesk and Unity Technologies that aims to leverage important societal topics through the means of games.

The team consisting of students from  Köln International School of Design and the Cologne Game Lab was honored at last week´s Games for Change Europe Awards in Paris with an unanimous decision by the Grand Jury: “An impressive, smart and elegant approach to the subject with an immediate impact on the players.”

 

Website: http://outcastedgame.com/

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/outcastedgame?fref=ts

11th Games For Change Awards

The 11th Annual Games For Change festival took place in New York City!

This year’s big award winner was Lucas Pope’s “Papers Please,” a game that also ranked first in Forbes’ Top 5 Indie Games of 2013.

Immigration is definitely a hot issue. Another game featured at the festival was “The Migrant Trail”,  free to play here. It presents a first-person journey through Arizona’s desert borderlands. Play as an undocumented immigrant attempting to cross the Arizona desert and/or a border patrol agent attempting to secure the border. “

Another award winner was “Mission US: Cheyenne Odyssey,” developed by THIRTEEN, American Social History Project, and Electric Funstuff. It won the award for the “Most Significant Impact” award. The game, which you can play for free here, is described as an interactive way to learn history. Designed for students grades 5-8, the game immerses students in a historic context.

read the full experience of Shapiro here.

According also to this sourcehe project, known as Block by Block

“The game makes everything transparent,” said Pontus Westerberg, a digital projects officer at the program, UN-Habitat. “It gives the communities we work with more agency and helps everyone see what’s going on.”

CAMEOVER – A new ‘Reality Game’ in Germany

The ‘Camover‘ movement is spreading across the country..

..despite the fact that there’s no real prize; scores and bonuses for destroying CCTV cameras – that’s what you get if you play this new ‘reality-game’ in Germany.

To participate in Camover, players form a team and give it a name – the ‘brigade’ part seems to be a must – and then go around town destroying CCTV cameras. The process has to be taped and posted online. Each team gets point for the number of destroyed cameras, as well as for creativity of execution.

The players are clear about their goals: “Although we call it a game, we are quite serious about it: Our aim is to destroy as many cameras as possible and to have an influence on video surveillance in our cities,” the creator of Camover told the Guardian.

The moral and legal concerns associated with the willful destruction of property in the real-world make this much more than a “game,” and the creators admit that it’s a serious matter. Camover’s anonymous founder tells The Guardian, “although we call it a game, we are quite serious about it: our aim is to destroy as many cameras as possible and to have an influence on video surveillance in our cities.” Camover ends today, on February 19th, the day that the European Police Congress starts.

Articles: Guardian, Russian TV.